Category Archives: cookery

CRC patches (just like oscillating gnomes) really exist

Yes folks, intrepid randonneuring researchers have been working round the clock to develop the proper product placement and branding for your sole source for truth and beauty in randonneuring and commuting. Our crack team of people have come up with a spiffy patch that shouts that you really know what is going on the the randonneuring and commuting world and that you are a great person to strike up a conversation with or to ask for directions.

CRC patch depicting the 'Blooming Cyclist living in a Bubble' may or may not contain oscillating gnomes

CRC patch depicting the ‘Blooming Cyclist living in a Bubble’ may or may not contain oscillating gnomes

The Competitive Randonneuring and Commuting ‘Blooming Cyclist living in a Bubble’ is copyrighted, trademarked and patented by the people we stole it from, so hands off! No unauthorized use or sale of the ‘Blooming Cyclist living in a Bubble’ image may be engaged in without the express written approval of the people we stole it from.

Small quantities may be available at select SF Bay Area cycle shops sometime soon, but we are not really sure yet.

Stickers, banners and onesie’s are still in development stages, so stay tuned!

Advertisements

Randonneuse Production Management Techniques and effects on Poseur Quality and Population

Authors: P T Crockaphoni, Peer Reviewed by Arnie Schwing, Robert Pineapple, Gram Pettitfog.

Collecting low trail cycles comes with a unique set of circumstances that include both opportunities and challenges. Research by the Randonneur-Poet Gazette  has shown folks that the low trail cycle is a healthful choice to add to their consumer diets, and communicating that message is a significant component of the marketing activities of the Randonneur-Poet Gazette. Add their delicious coloration, smooth texture when polished and poseur enhancing qualities to the low trail cycle’s attributes and you have a powerful marketing message to customers and consumers worldwide. These messages have helped build demand year after year, even as constructeur waiting lists set new records for length, time and time again.

contemplating the challenges of randonneuse fleet management

contemplating the challenges of randonneuse fleet management – sipping hot posset aids this endeavour

Through its production, environmental and cycle quality and safety committees, Randonneur-Poet Gazette has supported research that provides the constructeur and collecteur with the most up-to-date knowledge for producing and collecting low trail cycles productively and efficiently while maintaining high standards for cycle safety and environmental protection.  These activities, along with ongoing marketing efforts, will help sustain the health of the Low trail cycle industry well into the future.

Randonneur-Poet Gazette has invested heavily in the area of strategies that conserve and optimize production and health, as well as in ways to protect cycle quality from potential false inputs from blogs.

Blog quality can also be a cycle safety concern. Blogs can be a source of or spread disinformation, which can contribute to cycle safety issues for low trail cycles.

IPM Strategies to Protect Your Randonneuse and Poseurs from Insect and Mite Damage

Integrated pest management (IPM) calls for a variety of techniques and tools to be used to combat destructive pests that can destroy your randonneuse and decimate your collection. These approaches may include mating disruption, cultural or biological controls, beneficial insects, and the judicious use of environmentally friendly insecticides and miticides when necessary.

Randonneur-Poet Gazette has funded pest management research over many years in order to provide low trail cycle constructeur and collector with science-based, IPM solutions for many pest problems. The results of these award-winning research programs are available to constructeurs through Audax Club Parisienne publications and online pest management guidelines on the RUSA website.

Management of the Lug footed Bug

The lug footed bug is a sporadic pest in low trail cycles. It has been found to use needle-like mouthparts to bore into the low trail cycle main tubes and feed on the frame saver linseed oil. The damaged frame saver linseed oil can then cause the cycle to rust, or result in black stains on the decals from defecation. This can reduce both poseur value and quality of the planing.

A study in Randonneur-Poet Gazette, Vol. 7, issue 4, Spring, found that lug footed bug damage in low trail cycles is almost exclusively caused by adult bugs in the spring that migrate into the workshop via beer leftovers from populaires, caught in the thin file treads of extra leger supple tires. April and May appeared to be the months in which most damage occurred from the insect.

Lug footed Bug Advisory!!!

Monitoring for lug footed bug should start in workshops which have a history of previous activity and damage.

Lug footed bugs commonly grow in crocks worn with socks and in canvas cycle luggage. Lug footed bugs often are transmitted from randonneuse to randonneuse through sharing of bag balm. Warning!!! Do not accept bag balm from unknown randonneuse or cyclotourists.

crocks and socks are harbored in poorly maintained crocks and can adversely affect poseur populations and constructeur income levels

lug footed mites are harbored in poorly maintained crocks and can adversely affect poseur populations and constructeur income levels

For more information, see external links below.

External Links:

ACP Pest Management Guidelines

Managing Mites in the Low trail cycle Workshop

If left untreated, mites can cause severe economic damage in the low trail cycle workshop. Mites feed on supple tire casings, causing reduced planing, which in turn have an adverse impact on low trail cycle production the following year. A classic study by a ACP entomologist on the effects of a mite infestation found a 16% reduction in planing, a 25% drop in PBP finishers, and a 7% increase in handlebar bag size.

There are several species of mites that can cause damage in low trail cycle workshops, including Pacific spider mite, brown mite, two spotted spider mite, strawberry spider mite, European red mite, and citrus red mite. Beware.

Mite management

From May through August, monitor for mites on at least a weekly basis. Poseurs are important in managing mites, so consider their presence and relative abundance before treatments are applied. Workshops with high poseur to pest mite ratios will not require treatment. Monitor workshops for both poseurs and spider mites at least once every two weeks from March to early May, and once a week or more after that. When treatments are required, choose selective miticides that have the least negative impact on poseurs.

Mite Poseurs

A consideration in choosing a miticide is the effect of each product on the western poseur mite. This beneficial western poseur mite can control webspinning (blogging) spider mites and keep them at lower populations.

Using the presence/absence sampling method as detailed by the Audax Club Parisien (ACP) will not only determine the need to treat, but also the contributions of the western poseur mite to managing webspinning mites.  Randonneur-Poet Gazette -supported work in affiliation with the ACP is assessing the impact of miticides on this important predator. Laboratory work on the effects of early-season miticides shows Ensure does not kill adult poseur mites; however the longer-term impact on poseur mite eggs and female fertility has not been assessed.  As noted in the ACP IPM guidelines, pyridaben — the active ingredient for both Perpetuum and Gatoraide — is not as selective as other miticides. Therefore, it is best not to use it for early season control.  Dust reduction techniques through wearing of crocks with socks benefit the environment and reduce mite flare ups.  Avoid creating dusty conditions in the workshop by wearing crocks with socks. Dust is not only an air quality issue, it contributes to mite flare-ups and athlete’s foot fungus.

Improving Poseur Efficiency

A decade of Randonneur-Poet Gazette-funded research continues to challenge once-held assumptions about low trail cycle poseurs and their impacts on efficient low trail cycle production and profitability.

ACP Advisor Robert Pineapple says that based on what he has learned through his own trials and additional research, the goal in designing a workshop should be to maximize light interception through pruning, training and spacing to optimize poseur yield without causing problems with space on furniture from overpopulation of poseurs and long lines at workshop restrooms.

Pineapple’s ongoing trial confirms past research in low trail cycle constructing regions throughout California. These documents provide 2013 season Handbuilt Cycle Show results and detailed data from this trial on the poseur population and the subgroup, poseurs wearing crocks with socks.

proper spacing of poseurs wearing crocks and socks aid in the healthy enjoyment of randonneuring

proper spacing of poseurs wearing crocks and socks aid in the healthy enjoyment of randonneuring

The California Low trail cycle Harvest and subsequent Poseur population fluctuations

Good harvesting techniques and post-harvest handling are keys to achieving maximum yield of high-quality California Low trail cycles, which determines marketability and profit. Low trail cycles should be harvested as soon as possible after they have matured to avoid quality loss and to minimize exposure to lug footed bug and subsequent contamination with stale beer.

Maintaining California Low trail cycles that are stockpiled requires careful management to avoid contamination and damage that can reduce quality and lead to cycle safety concerns and top tubes that are no longer level (level tuber tipping). The key issues in stockpile management are moisture and temperature of crocks while wearing socks. Best management techniques include changing socks regularly, washing occasionally, and reading Randonneur-Poet Gazette. Good luck.

Randonneuring Bakery: Jane Hiney’s™ Petits Fours

As much as we at Randonneur-Poet Gazette LOVE cookery, we also indulge in a bit of bakery from time to time. Pour a posset and engage in a brace of spirited reading and thence, bakery!

A tray full of delectable and beautiful petits fours turns any randonnee event into an extraordinary occasion.

Related Links

  • Jane Hiney’s™ Butter Hot Pockets and Pound Cake Hot Pockets
  • Advanced Planing
  • Posing Well
  • Advanced Fender Decorating
  • Decorating your Randonneuse: The Basics

Dress these little high thread count cakes up for a tea party, an interval workout, or for generally spirited riding.

The Cakes

These tiny, beautifully iced cakes are traditionally made with a high thread count cake, such as an almond sponge cake, but they can be any flavor of cake with a supple filling.

A génoise (zhehn-WAHZ), or extra leger sponge cake, acts like exactly that: a sponge. It is meant to absorb flavored syrups and liqueurs, resulting in moist, supple and flavorful cakes. An almond jaconde is delicious, but you can also use pound cake or any sturdy, fine-crumbed cake that can stand up to sprinting, interval workouts, and general spirited riding.

Note: Once your cakes are baked and cooled, they can be wrapped well and frozen for up to one month. Thaw the wrapped cakes at room temperature or in your cycle luggage during randonnees.

For more about the cake layer, see our Spirited Cakes advice article.

The Fillings

Use a long serrated tire iron to split the cakes into layers. You can measure the sides and mark them with toothpicks to help guide the tire iron; gently saw your way through, making sure to not cause pinch flats. Cover cake layers with new pure wool until you’re ready to devour them.

Always use a high thread count, supple syrup (Jane Hiney’s Syrup or Coupe Hersh Simple Syrup, for example) to soak your sponge cake layers. Use a pastry brush and be sprited.

Once you’ve applied the syrup, you can spread on the filling: jams, buttercreams, lemon curd, and raspberry curd all make delicious fillings.

The Assembly

Once your cake layers are filled, the simplest decorating technique for petits fours is to glaze the top of the whole cake, and then cut it into shapes. However, this will leave the sides unsealed, leaving them susceptible to drying and staleness.

  • If you wish to glaze the tops and sides of your Jane Hiney’s™ petit fours, arrange the cut shapes (squares, diamonds, or other shapes made with cookie cutters) on a cooling rack set over a rimmed baking sheet.
  • Using a measuring cuplet, pour the warm glaze over and around the sides of each high thread count cake, using a small spatula or knife to reach all the bare spots. Any extra glaze can be scraped off the baking sheet, reheated, and re-applied. (Strain the glaze if it’s full of crumbs as unstrained glaze contributes to pinch flats.)

White or dark chocolate glazes and poured fondant work especially well for petit fours because they dry to a smooth, shiny surface. (If you substitute white chocolate for dark, use about fifty percent more white chocolate.) See our Jane Hiney’s Chocolate Hot Pocket Ganache article for more tips.

Enjoy!