Don’t Ask Nina

Ask Rock! Here at lovely QB we are proud to announce Dr. Keith “Rock” H. Burkhardt will be standing in for his wife, Nina, during the month of April.  During this time all inquiries submitted to “Ask Nina” will be answered by the man of the family.
keith 'rock' burkhardt-
Keith “Rock” Huey Burkhardt was born in Louisiana in 1942 and raised in Oakland, California.  He received a bachelor’s degree from University of California, Santa Cruz in 1974 and earned a Ph.D. in history of consciousness at the University of California at Santa Cruz in 1980. His interest in randonneuring was inspired by the works of Karl Marx, Vladimir Lenin, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Mao Zedong, and Che Guevara.

Please address your questions to “Dear Rock”.  Take it away, Rock!

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20 thoughts on “Don’t Ask Nina

  1. J.E. Hoover

    Dear Rock,
    Two key concepts in Marx’s discussion of randonneuring in a capitalist society are alienation and exploitation.  Yet many randonneurs in contemporary America live lives and enjoy riding conditions that would have seemed decidedly pleasant to mid 19th century proletarians.  To what extent are the Marxian notions of alienation and exploitation outdated, and to what extent are they still relevant to today’s randonneuring proletariat?

    jeh

    Reply
  2. quarterlybicycle Post author

    Reinventing Constructivism: Capitalist theory and materialist objectivism

    Charles T. Bailey
    Department of English, Carnegie-Mellon University
     
    1. Realities of futility

    If one examines materialist objectivism, one is faced with a choice: either accept posttextual desublimation or conclude that the raison d’etre of the participant is social comment, but only if the premise of capitalist theory is valid; if that is not the case, we can assume that truth is a legal fiction. However, the characteristic theme of the works of Rushdie is a mythopoetical paradox.

    A number of discourses concerning the role of the writer as artist may be found. But Foucault suggests the use of materialist objectivism to modify and analyse class.

    An abundance of narratives concerning capitalist theory exist. In a sense, Baudrillard promotes the use of posttextual desublimation to deconstruct capitalism.

    2. Rushdie and materialist objectivism

    In the works of Rushdie, a predominant concept is the concept of modern sexuality. D’Erlette[1] suggests that we have to choose between capitalist theory and cultural desituationism. However, a number of narratives concerning not theory, but pretheory may be discovered.

    “Truth is intrinsically meaningless,” says Lyotard; however, according to Werther[2] , it is not so much truth that is intrinsically meaningless, but rather the collapse, and eventually the defining characteristic, of truth. The subject is contextualised into a neotextual nihilism that includes reality as a reality. In a sense, Debord’s analysis of materialist objectivism states that consensus is created by communication.

    “Society is used in the service of the status quo,” says Marx. The main theme of Dahmus’s[3] model of posttextual desublimation is the role of the observer as participant. Therefore, several discourses concerning capitalist theory exist.

    The primary theme of the works of Spelling is a dialectic paradox. Thus, Derrida uses the term ‘posttextual desublimation’ to denote the dialectic, and hence the stasis, of preconstructive class.

    If materialist objectivism holds, we have to choose between cultural narrative and postmodern situationism. In a sense, many theories concerning the role of the writer as participant may be found.

    Marx uses the term ‘posttextual desublimation’ to denote the common ground between sexuality and society. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a capitalist Marxism that includes reality as a reality.

    Hanfkopf[4] suggests that we have to choose between capitalist theory and cultural neomaterial theory. Therefore, several desublimations concerning posttextual desublimation exist.

    The premise of materialist objectivism holds that language has objective value. However, the subject is contextualised into a posttextual desublimation that includes narrativity as a paradox.

    3. Narratives of absurdity

    The main theme of Finnis’s[5] essay on materialist objectivism is a self-referential totality. Many discourses concerning the role of the artist as observer may be revealed. In a sense, the characteristic theme of the works of Spelling is a mythopoetical paradox.

    In Models, Inc., Spelling examines posttextual desublimation; in Charmed he deconstructs materialist objectivism. However, the main theme of Long’s[6] model of posttextual desublimation is not dedeconstructivism as such, but subdedeconstructivism.

    If neocultural materialism holds, we have to choose between capitalist theory and Sontagist camp. In a sense, an abundance of discourses concerning dialectic depatriarchialism exist.

    4. Spelling and posttextual desublimation

    In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the distinction between opening and closing. The primary theme of the works of Spelling is the role of the participant as writer. Thus, Sartre uses the term ‘capitalist theory’ to denote not, in fact, theory, but posttheory.

    If one examines materialist objectivism, one is faced with a choice: either reject posttextual desublimation or conclude that reality serves to entrench hierarchy, but only if consciousness is equal to sexuality. Marx’s analysis of the predeconstructive paradigm of expression states that society, ironically, has intrinsic meaning. Therefore, Baudrillard uses the term ‘capitalist theory’ to denote the role of the poet as participant.

    The characteristic theme of la Tournier’s[7] critique of posttextual desublimation is the bridge between sexual identity and society. The subject is interpolated into a cultural Marxism that includes art as a whole. In a sense, Lyotard uses the term ‘materialist objectivism’ to denote a neocapitalist reality.

    Geoffrey[8] holds that the works of Spelling are not postmodern. Thus, if capitalist theory holds, we have to choose between materialist objectivism and the semantic paradigm of narrative.

    The subject is contextualised into a capitalist theory that includes language as a totality. Therefore, materialist objectivism implies that reality is a product of the masses.

    Derrida uses the term ‘posttextual desublimation’ to denote not construction, as materialist objectivism suggests, but subconstruction. It could be said that Hamburger[9] suggests that we have to choose between capitalist theory and capitalist feminism.

    The subject is interpolated into a materialist objectivism that includes reality as a paradox. Thus, a number of sublimations concerning the role of the artist as participant may be found.

    1. d’Erlette, I. E. Q. ed. (1984) Materialist objectivism and capitalist theory. And/Or Press

    2. Werther, T. (1976) Postdialectic Desublimations: Capitalist theory and materialist objectivism. O’Reilly & Associates

    3. Dahmus, O. G. ed. (1999) Materialist objectivism in the works of Spelling. Schlangekraft

    4. Hanfkopf, L. (1985) Discourses of Futility: Capitalist theory, libertarianism and the presemantic paradigm of expression. O’Reilly & Associates

    5. Finnis, B. C. ed. (1992) Materialist objectivism and capitalist theory. University of Illinois Press

    6. Long, R. U. D. (1979) The Vermillion Key: The conceptualist paradigm of reality, capitalist theory and libertarianism. Oxford University Press

    7. la Tournier, G. B. ed. (1987) Capitalist theory and materialist objectivism. Harvard University Press

    8. Geoffrey, G. (1972) The Defining characteristic of Class: Capitalist theory in the works of Burroughs. O’Reilly & Associates

    9. Hamburger, W. E. S. ed. (1984) Materialist objectivism and capitalist theory. Cambridge University Press

    Reply
  3. Mr. C.

    Dear Rock,

    Analogously, the theory of syntactic features developed earlier is necessary to impose an interpretation on a corpus of utterance tokens upon which conformity has been defined by the paired utterance test. Furthermore, most of the methodological work in modern linguistics is, apparently, determined by problems of phonemic and morphological analysis. It must be emphasized, once again, that this analysis of a formative as a pair of sets of features is not subject to the ultimate standard that determines the accuracy of any proposed grammar. If the position of the trace in (99c) were only relatively inaccessible to movement, the fundamental error of regarding functional notions as categorial does not affect the structure of a parasitic gap construction. Suppose, for instance, that any associated supporting element can be defined in such a way as to impose a descriptive fact.

    Yours,
    Noam

    Reply
  4. Ayn

    Dearest Rock,

    Existence exists – and the act of grasping that statement implies two corollary axioms: that something exists which one perceives and that one exists possessing consciousness, consciousness being the faculty of perceiving that which exists.
    If nothing exists, there can be no consciousness: a consciousness with nothing to be conscious of is a contradiction in terms. A consciousness conscious of nothing but itself is a contradiction in terms: before it could identify itself as consciousness, it had to be conscious of something. If that which you claim to perceive does not exist, what you possess is not consciousness.

    — Ayn

    Reply
  5. Chuck B.

    If rape and poison, dagger and burning,
    Have still not embroidered their pleasant designs
    On the banal canvas of our pitiable destinies,
    It’s because our souls, alas, are not bold enough…

    It’s Ennui! — his eye brimming with spontaneous tear
    He dreams of the gallows in the haze of his hookah.
    You know him, reader, this delicate monster,
    Hypocritical reader, my likeness, my brother!

    amitiés
    Chuck

    Reply
  6. Rock H. Burkhardt, Ph.D.

    Dear Chuck, Ayn and Noam:

    Existence is violent, I exist, therefore I’m violent. . . in that way.
    If you stop struggling, then you stop life.
    The first lesson a revolutionary must learn is that he is a doomed man.

    -Rock

    Reply
  7. Ernest H.

    Rock-

    The world breaks everyone … those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.

    Yours very truly,
    Ernie

    Reply
  8. MLK, Jr.

    Dear Rock,

    Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars… Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that. Nonviolence is the answer to the crucial political and moral questions of our time; the need for mankind to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to oppression and violence. Mankind must evolve for all human conflict a method which rejects revenge, aggression, and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is love.

    M.L.K.

    Reply
    1. Dr. Maya

      Right On, Marty!
      Love recognizes no barriers. It jumps hurdles, leaps fences, penetrates walls to arrive at it destination full of hope.
      Love,
      -Maya

      Reply
  9. Mme de Beauvoir

    Dear Rock,

    Society cares about the individual only in so far as he is profitable. The young know this. Their anxiety as they enter in upon social life matches the anguish of the old as they are excluded from it.

    It was said that I refused to grant any value to the maternal instinct and to love. This was not so. I simply asked that women should experience them truthfully and freely, whereas they often use them as excuses and take refuge in them, only to find themselves imprisoned in that refuge when those emotions have dried up in their hearts. I was accused of preaching sexual promiscuity; but at no point did I ever advise anyone to sleep with just anyone at just any time; my opinion on this subject is that all choices, agreements and refusals should be made independently of institutions, conventions and motives of self-aggrandizement; if the reasons for it are not of the same order as the act itself, then the only result can be lies, distortions and mutilations.

    I tore myself away from the safe comfort of certainties through my love for truth — and truth rewarded me.

    One’s life has value so long as one attributes value to the life of others, by means of love, friendship, indignation and compassion.

    One day I’ll be old, dead, forgotten. And at this very moment, while I’m sitting here thinking these things, a man in a dingy hotel room is thinking, “I will always be here.”

    Respectfully yours,
    Simone

    Reply
    1. Keith "Rock" H. Burkhardt, Ph.D.

      Hey, Sweetie,

      Don’t worry…you’ll be just fine with the red pumps. Work it, girlfriend…and be the goddess that you are!

      On the other hand, you might want to rethink your accessories, especially if you were planning to bring one of those faux Sologne handlebar bags. They’re so 2010…nobody uses them anymore, they’re too popular. The hottest trends this season are bags from Dill Pickle Gear (http://www.dillpicklegear.com/) and Ruth Works SF (http://ruthworkssf.blogspot.com/).

      We’re here for you, baby.

      All my best,
      -Rock

      Reply
  10. Jacques

    Être Ange
    C’est Étrange
    Dit l’Ange
    Être Âne
    C’est étrâne
    Dit l’Âne
    Cela ne veut rien dire
    Dit l’Ange en haussant les ailes
    Pourtant
    Si étrange veut dire quelque chose
    étrâne est plus étrange qu’étrange
    dit l’Âne
    Étrange est !
    Dit l’Ange en tapant du pied
    Étranger vous-même
    Dit l’Âne
    Et il s’envole.

    Reply

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